It’s no secret that relationships take work, but sometimes enough is enough. We all have our limits and there are certain things we just cannot tolerate any longer—or at all. So where do you draw the line?

Definite Deal Breakers

Whether you’re starting a relationship or already in one, there are some things that are definite deal breakers—no ifs, ands or buts.

Domestic and/or sexual violence is number one. Of course you may not see it at the outset of your romance, but if the slightest hint comes up, run don’t walk away.

Domestic and/or sexual violence is number one. Of course you may not see it at the outset of your romance, but if the slightest hint comes up, run don’t walk away.

Another major deal breaker is mental or emotional abuse. You won’t notice that right away either, but you’ll catch little signs here and there. Does your partner respect you or do you find that you get little digs and insults from time to time? This could be an indication of a deeper problem. Be sure to watch out.

Other than these major warnings, most other deal breakers are pretty much up for negotiation, but a lot depends on what is most important to you.

Maybe Deal Breakers

There are plenty of possible deal breakers or “maybes” out there. This is where things get tricky. It’s really a matter of personal choice. What are you willing to: a) put up with, b) negotiate or work on, and c) not deal with at all. This leaves the field wide open.

While you’re thinking about it, here are some common deal breakers according to relationship experts.

Infidelity is often number one on the list. A partner who cheats is a deal breaker for most, but some are willing to work on it through counseling.

Lack of intimacy and/or compatibility both in and out of the bedroom are also problems.

Then there are more personal deal breakers like religious and moral views, hobbies, money management, politics—the list is practically endless!

Drawing the Line

So when it comes right down to it, where exactly do you draw the line? Only you can know for sure, so the best advice is to follow your own heart, mind and intuition.

If you’re confused, counseling can help, but sometimes a simple question can make all the difference: Do you think you’d be happier with or without your partner? That may help you decide.